2021

Vol 3, No.2 CANCER PLUS

Table of Contents

Review Articles

by Md. Alauddin, Afroza Sultana, Yearul Kabir
107 Views, 41 PDF Downloads
Cancer and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are associated with genetic mutation and often seen as the results of altered metabolic signals. Several nutraceuticals have been found to be effective in treating these diseases in clinical practice through the modulation of biochemical and clinical endpoints associated with the pathogenesis of cancer and MetS. In line with the availability of multiple interventions that could counteract the metabolic changes, there is mounting evidence for nutraceuticals as potential complementary medicine for these diseases on the foundation of their multi-factorial nature. Although cancer and MetS are the major contributors to deaths globally, the therapeutic effects of nutraceuticals and the role of nutritional genetics and nutritional genomics in the treatment of these diseases have not yet been explored in-depth. In recent years, many studies revealed that certain compounds are able to halt the progression of cancer and MetS and subsequently improve individual health through the regulation of metabolic gene expression. In this review, we examine the relationship of nutraceutical, nutritional genetics, and nutritional genomics in the context of personalized medicine. The discrepancies in response to bioactive food components due to inter-individual variabilities in genetics, epigenetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics are also discussed.
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Review Articles

by Yihui Yang, Liwen Ren, Hong Yang, Binbin Ge, Wan Li, Yumin Wang, Hongquan Wang, Guanhua Du, Bo Tang, Jinhua Wang
94 Views, 31 PDF Downloads

Primary liver cancer is the sixth most prevalent cancer worldwide and ranked in third for cancer-related mortality rate. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for about 90% of all primary liver cancers. High vascularization of HCC implies the significance of angiogenesis in the development and pathogenesis of HCC. Several angiogenic pathways have been identified as being dysregulated in HCC, highlighting potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of HCC. In 2007, sorafenib was approved as the standard first-line treatment for advanced HCC, catapulting the therapeutic approach of HCC into the avenue of targeted therapy. In recent years, the approval of several novel targeted drugs and the progress in combination of immunotherapy and targeted therapies provide more alternatives for the treatment of HCC. The progress of anti-angiogenesis therapies in HCC over the past few decades is reviewed and the future prospect of anti-angiogenesis therapy for HCC is also discussed.

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Review Articles

by Tian Tang, Jinhan Yang, Siyuan Jing
87 Views, 12 PDF Downloads

Transferrin receptor (TfR) is a glycoprotein that transfers iron from the extracellular matrix to the intracellular environment. Due to the rapid proliferation need, the demand for iron in cancer cells is much greater than in normal cells, possibly explaining the upregulated TfR expression in cancer cells. The overexpression of TfR and its extracellular accessibility, ability to internalize, and central role in cancer cell make this receptor a potential target for antibody-mediated therapy. The TfR can be targeted indirectly by antibodies conjugated to anti-cancer agents or directly through the use of antibodies that disrupt the function of the receptor and induce Fc-mediated effector functions. This article reviews the developments of antibody-based cancer therapy targeting TfR.

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